Curipod is created to promote curiosity and critical thinking. These skills are important in history classes for all ages. In this article we have collected Curipod activities for the history subject from teachers all over the world.

The most important goal of Curipod is to make sure all of your students engage, because students that engage in discussions and classroom activities learn more.


First time using Curipod?

These activities are quick and easy to get started. They work great as warm up activities at the begging of the class or to wrap everything up at the end.


(1) Kickstart your class โšก๏ธ (5 min)

You can use Curipod in the beginning of a new topic. If you are starting on "The industrial revolution" you can create a Question round with the topic: "Questions about the Industrial revolution". This is a great opportunity for the students to ask some questions they have about the Industrial Revolution before you get started with your teaching.

This gives you an overview of the general knowledge of the class, but more importantly, every student have formulated a question. This increases motivation and makes it more fun to learn, because you have a concrete question you want an answer to.

End the activity by answering the top question.

(2) Quiz your students ๐Ÿ™โ€โ™‚๏ธ (5 min)

Create an Answer round at the end of your class where you check how much your students have learned. If your class is about WW2 you can for instance ask: "In your opinion, what is the most important cause of WW2?"


Every student answer the question and then vote for the ones they think are great answers. You get a great overview of your students outcome from the class.

(3) Brainstorming ๐Ÿ’ก (5 min)

Brainstorming is a great way to get your students active and awake. You can for example brainstorm: "How would the world look today without The Age of Enlightenment". This is a fun activity to engage everyone.



๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘งโ€๐Ÿ‘ง Group activities (30 min)

In this activity the goal is to let your students work together in groups trying to answer questions from the class.

Start the activity with a Question round in Curipod. For instance, if your class is working with The American Revolution, you can let all your students ask questions about the topic "The causes of the American Revolution".

First the students ask their questions and then they vote for the questions most of them are curious about and you get an overview of the top questions.

Now divide your students into groups and give every group one or more of the top questions to answer together. At the end of the activity, all the groups present their answers to the class.


๐Ÿ™‹โ€โ™€๏ธ๐Ÿ™Žโ€โ™‚๏ธ Let your students answer their own questions (15 min)

What is better than student involvement? In this activity the goal is to let the students try to answer their own questions. Students learn more if they have questions they want to answer.

Start the activity with a Question round in Curipod. For instance, if your class is working with The Cold War Era, you can let all your students ask questions about the topic "Questions about the Cold War Era".

First the students ask their questions and then they vote for the questions most of them are curious about and you get an overview of the top questions.

Then you create an Answer round in Curipod, where the question to answer is the number one question from the Question round. Play the answer round with the students, and let them try to answer their own top question from before.


๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐ŸŽ“ Learn to ask great questions in history (20 min)

The goal of this activity is let the students learn the value of asking great questions to become independent learners.

Start the activity with a Question round in Curipod. For instance, if your class is working with The French Revolution, you can let all your students ask questions about the topic "Questions about the The French Revolution".

Let your students know that they are supposed to ask questions that will increase their understanding of the French Revolution.

First the students ask their questions and then they vote for the questions most of them are curious about and you get an overview of the top questions.

After the voting you can use the list of the top questions for a classroom discussion on how to ask great questions in history. Use the questions as examples. What makes this a great question? Is this question biased?


๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐ŸŽ“ Learn to talk about history (20 min)

The goal of this activity is to let the students learn that to advance in history it is not enough to know all the facts. You also have to present your understanding and reflections to show your knowledge.

Start the activity with a Answer round in Curipod. For instance, if your class is working with The American Revolution, you can let your students answer the question: "What caused the American Revolution?".

First the students answer the question, and then they vote for the answers most of them agree with. Then you get a list of the top answers.

After the voting you can use the list of the top answers for a classroom discussion on how to formulate great answers in history. Use the answers as examples and involve them in the discussion. Why is this answer more precise? Why do this show more understanding of the causes?



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